News

New Chris Pfanner Antihero part with heavy cameos

Saturday, October 3rd, 2020

Let’s be honest, AH are pretty much untouchable when it comes to video releases and this here new Chris Pfanner Antihero part with heavy cameos from the crew only serves to reiterate this.
As ever, released with minimum Social Media circle jerking beforehand, this one fell straight into our collective eyeballs and delivered. It’s highly reassuring that in a skateboard universe where Nyjah can barely go for a shit without 85 repost Insta accounts frothing about it, Antihero just go skating, film it and then let us see it without all the algorithmic cock-teasing that everyone else seems to be addicted to.

In terms of what you get – eight and a half minutes of Pfanner doing what he does best: blasting full speed, leaping everything in his path and somehow making moustaches seem dope. No half-stepping here – this is all-killer from the now 36 year old beast himself. In amongst the Chris Pfanner footage you also get a brace of Frank Gerwer, Raney Beres, GT, recent Antihero recruit Victor Pellegrin and Daan Van Der Linden clips. I’m struggling to recommend this further than just describing who’s on it to be honest but if you need more, Daan’s cameo’s consists of three enders effectively and that’s only scratching the surface on what’s on this.
If you’re not already all about Antihero then there’s something wrong with you.
Tune in, turn on, tweak out.

New Chris Pfanner Antihero part

Although not directly connected to the above we’d be remiss if we didn’t raise our glasses in memory of DLXSF stable mate and skate industry legend Keith Hufnagel who sadly passed away in late September. It’s no exaggeration to say that Huf’s influence on skateboarding culture is almost unparalleled.
Not only did his style and approach to skateboarding help to redefine street skating, but his subsequent pioneering involvement in the skateboard industry helped to redefine skater-owned retail and soft goods models the world over. His early passing leaves a huge void at the centre of skate culture and we would like to offer our condolences and deepest sympathies to his family and friends across the globe. Rest in power.


Eddie Belvedere and Sam Mason hit Germany for Dickies

Monday, September 14th, 2020

Strong Black Sheep family representation here with Eddie Belvedere and Sam Mason joining forces with Cornish heads Rhys Bickmore and master lens man Matt Hunt.
Flucht aus England, (AKA ‘Escape from England) sees Captain Caveman, Simply Shred and crew hit up up the German city of Köln on a four day camping/skate mission.
This one was filmed after Covid restrictions had been briefly lifted in August of this year with the lads chomping at the bit to go anywhere with a modicum of liberty.
A quick ferry journey and camping chair chill and bosch (forgive the German pun) our intrepid group of goons were happily chewing on German architecture.
With Dickies (along with Mount Hawke and Blacksheep) funding this one, Eddie Belvedere and Sam Mason led the charge around Köln hitting up various spots, including the frankly amazing looking KAP 686 skate plaza (hit that link for more on that place).

Eddie Belvedere and Sam Mason

Eddie and co skate all manner of street spots, bringing with them that peculiarly British notion of ‘if it’s a bank, it’s a skate spot, even if it’s horrible’.
Some places you’ll recognise as they’ve appeared on some heavy videos in the past, whereas others are new to us and probably to you too. Based on this though, Köln looks like a decent choice for a skate trip, well as soon as we’re allowed the leave the house again anyway.

For those you who aren’t already aware, Matt Hunt (the guy behind the camera on this one) has been making UK skate videos for a long while so, if this floats your boat, go peep some more of his stuff.

Click here for a brace of archive Cornish footage (including a Fallen tour visit to Truro) and below for a 2019 Cornwall-based piece for Flavour skatestore in Newquay.

Embrace the crust!


A double dose of Louie Lopez courtesy of Converse Cons & FA

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2020

A right old treat here with a double dose of Louie Lopez, dropping virtually simultaneously from Converse Cons and FA. Is there a better human representation of a skateboarding come-up based on sheer talent and humility than that of LA’s very own Mr Lopez?
Louie’s skateboarding journey has been documented and under the microscope from the tender age of 13. For many, this attention has proved to be a destructive force, releasing the twin demons of underage insanity and regrettable kiddy-style documentation – for a variety of reasons however, Louie Lopez has managed to swerve this wunderkind curse and mature into one of the most highly rated skaters on the planet.

Louie’s earliest exposure was as the long-haired and brace-wearing mini ripper announced in Globe footwear’s United by Fate (2007) and then cemented into skate lore in his banger 2009 Extremely Sorry part for former sponsors Flip Skateboards.
Despite the expected sniping of the time, aimed squarely at Flip skateboards‘ acquisition of Louie, (along with fellow murder midgets Curren Caples and David Gonzalez) Jeremy Fox, Ian Deacon and Geoff Rowley‘s eye for talent was vindicated once again with all three additions maturing into some of the gnarliest skaters on the planet a few years later.

A double dose of Louie Lopez

This first of this week’s double dose of Louie Lopez comes in the form of a three minute part (we think it’s solid enough to warrant that description) filmed in and around Louie’s native LA during the last 6 months of lockdown. Hands get sliced open by skate-stoppers, the infamous LAX banks get treated to an unfathomable backside noseblunt slide shove it, the Sister Sledge track rules and there’s little to no bullshit over-zoom filming. In short – it’s everything that you could ask for in a clip. Get it watched immediately.

If you’re not satisfied by the Converse Cons ‘Lola’ clip above never fear, as Jason Dill and AVE‘s FA World Entertainment have your back with a slightly shorter, slightly rawer but equally as cracking expose of Louie’s undeniable talents in the form of the ‘The Louie Lopez II’.


New Jordan Sharkey part for Vans Europe

Monday, August 10th, 2020

Hyped on this new Jordan Sharkey part for Vans Europe!
If you’re thirsty for more banger UK content then look no further. Here’s a Black Sheep family duo serving up an all new Jordan Sharkey part for Vans Europe. Filmed and edited by long-time Black Sheep media node and one-time rugby star-in-the-making Isaac Wilkinson: this is all killer, no filler.

Luckily for you all, Vague skate mag have seen fit to conduct an interview with our Welsh brother too, so you can hear a lot of the background behind the filming of this piece, of Jordan winning the Berrics/Element ‘Make It Count’ contest and more besides.
If you’ve had the pleasure to meet Jordan Sharkey in real life then you’ll also know that he’s as insanely talented in the flesh as he is on video, which is probably why Nick Stansfield added him to the Black Sheep team only 30 minutes after meeting him.

Isaac and blondie are a team and a half and this latest Jordan Sharkey part for Vans Europe follows in the wake of a brace of other banging releases from the pair. If you fancy peeping a few of those, keep scrolling past this text and you’ll find a few embedded for your pleasure. Big love to Jordan for always repping so hard and never losing his grip on the beaming grom that he started off as. Likewise, heavy knuckles to Isaac Wilkinson for always coming through with the goods, despite his high octane career filming biscuit commercials for her Majesty. HD 4:3 on point big man!

Full props also to Manhead and all at Vans Europe for keeping Jordan in shoes and of course, to Element skateboards for hooking him up as properly as his talent deserves.

New Jordan Sharkey part for Vans Europe

Check out Jordan in Element’s recent Knucks video (by French Fred) below.


New Jordan Sharkey part for Vans Europe

After that, peep this earlier Issac and Sharkey collab piece celebrating the Element x Black Sheep Ten Year anniversary release from a couple of year back.

And then finally, for now – take in Isaac Wilkinson’s full-length Black Sheep video 01FUCKIN61 and go skateboarding.


Tony Hawk discussing legendary skate spots and ripping as usual

Wednesday, August 5th, 2020

If you’re too cool to openly admit that big Tone is dope then you’re dead to us.
The video above featuring Tony Hawk discussing legendary skate spots just cements it, again.
Mainstream coverage of skateboard culture doesn’t have the best track record if we’re honest. From 7-Sports Wigan contest coverage back in the 80’s (complete with Bill Danforth pissed up on the mic) to New York Times coverage of the rise of Tyshawn Jones, they just seem to always make a bollocks of it. I mean in their defense, that might be just because skateboarders are notoriously picky but, you all know what we mean.

Anyway, with that said, and very probably due in part to Tony Hawk‘s involvement, we’ll put our hands up and admit that this Vox piece, which sees Tony Hawk discussing legendary skate spots alongside skateboarding’s premier academic Iain Borden, is definitely worth a watch.
From Mount Baldy to Natas Kaupas’ infamous hydrant, this is an in-depth look at many of America’s (primarily at least) most iconic spots accompanied with discussion by Tone and Iain and a brace of archive footage. You’ll love this whether you’re a 15 year old stair hero or an arthritic 50 year old struggling to force your beer gut up a kerb.
As an additional (and customary) treat – you’ll find links to various other bits of documentary coverage of skate culture (both good and awful) littered through this text – take your fingers for a wander and scoff at Danforth’s not-so-subtle digs at Sean Goff nearly 30 years ago.

Tony Hawk discussing legendary skate spots

If you enjoyed the above, get your eyeballs around some more Tony Hawk ripping courtesy of the latest Homies clip featuring Independent Trucks riders big Tone, Omar Hassan and various others skating tons of classic spots in Montreal, Canada.

Now go enjoy the sun whilst it’s here and don’t pay any attention to all this foolish talk of a skateboard hardware drought – we’re stocked to the gills like always.
Visit our web store or come in and see us and we’ll sort you right out.
Avanti Jerry!


Ali Boulala on The Bunt podcast

Friday, July 10th, 2020

Long time fans of the podcast here at Black Sheep, (especially during lock down) so we thought we’d share the news that last month saw Ali Boulala on The Bunt podcast. For those who don’t know already, The Bunt is a long-running skate podcast run by two very funny Canadian skaters. The hosts, Cephas and Donovan have a reputation for securing the guests you want to hear from and for asking hilariously blunt questions.

Over the years since they started (back in 2015/2016) The Bunt podcast has produced some of the funniest and most truthful interviews in skateboarding history with guests ranging from their Canadian friends to the likes of Jake Phelps and Brian Wenning. If you’re not already a fan of their output – we strongly recommend jumping over to their site at The Bunt Live and catching up.

 

Anyhow, as regards Ali Boulala on The Bunt podcast, get yourselves ready for an uplifting chat with Ali covering everything from the filming of Flip skateboards‘ Sorry video, living with Tom Penny in France, the origins of Baker skateboards and his current involvement in a Swedish-made documentary on his life.
The Bunt guys avoid the much-discussed tragic accident that resulted in the death of Shane Cross and the long-term hospitalisation and subsequent imprisonment of Ali.
If you want to hear that story, then re-visit the Epicly Later’d series on that here.

 

 

As we’ve touched on Baker Skateboards above (and below) – it seems sensible to also include the latest video release from them featuring their newest recruit, the insanely talented Jacopo Carozzi, wrecking shop in his native Milan just prior to Italy’s Covid lock down.

 

 

In more related Baker connections, the next podcast from The Bunt following the Ali Boulala one above is with Baker OG/owner and current Deathwish skateboards pro Erik Ellington.
As with the Ali Boulala interview above, The Bunt comes through with the insight on this one, plus heavy hilarity regarding the infamous ‘Carlsberg Gap’.

 

 

Hope everyone is well out there – don’t forget that our store is now open (for the rest of July) on Fridays and Saturdays 10-5 and Sundays 11-5. Our online webstore is open always for anything you need. Stay safe.

Ali Boulala on The Bunt podcast

For blacksheepstore voucher code checkout 1discount


Black Sheep family member Jiri Bulin for Piilgrim clothing

Wednesday, July 1st, 2020

 

Stoked on this for all kinds of reasons but not least as it sees Black Sheep family member Jiri Bulin take the curtains. ‘Chrysalis’ is the suitably psychedelic latest release from Mark Kendrick’s ethically-minded clothing brand Piilgrim. For those of you who don’t recognise Mark’s name – he’s been a face on the UK skate scene for many years, as both a ripper in his own right and the man behind the camera.
Piilgrim’s mission statement is to create clothing using ethical processes and to attempt to reduce waste involved to as close to zero as possible. Highly commendable stuff indeed.

For a more in-depth insight into Piilgrim and Mark Kendrick’s back catalogue of video produce to date – hit the link earlier in this sentence and read the interview that Jenkem Mag did to coincide with their online premiere of Chrysalis back in the darker depth of the Covid-19 lock down era.

 

Anyhow, onto the meat of this particular sandwich, (vegan meat substitute that is obviously). Chrysalis serves up a veritable smorgasbord of North West related rippers including Black Sheep family member Jiri Bulin, plus the likes of Keanu Robson, Zach Riley, Ricky Davidson, Jeremy Jones, UK legend Franklin Stephens plus recent US additions Corey Duffel and Pat Burke. The whole thing is absolutely banging from start to finish and all involved deserve hearty back slaps. If you missed the online premiere – now’s the time to wise your eyes up. Go peep.

 

In related Jiri Bulin news, our very own Czech Manc, his lovely family and an assortment of local heroes have also been hard at work during lock down creating DIY gold in otherwise unused space. If you’re keen to get involved with that project, either by donating funds, materials or your labour then go check out the Instagram account @beesidediy and/or sling them some funds through their Go Fund Me here.

 

Jiri is sponsored by Black Sheep, Toy Machine, Pig Wheels, Etnies, Theeve trucks and Piilgrim clothing.

Black Sheep family member Jiri Bulin


Vans release a new Chukka Pro to celebrate Danny Wainwright

Monday, June 29th, 2020

2020 sees Vans release a new Chukka Pro to celebrate Danny Wainwright and his 20 year association with the brand. There are few UK heads with careers as multi-faceted as Danny’s so, in recognition of this fact we caught up with him to chew that fat and discuss the background to this Chukka Pro release.
Dotted throughout are a bunch of Danny Wainwright videos relating some of his contributions to skateboarding but they only represent a tiny faction of his overall output. He’s had more UK skate mag covers than anyone else in history, he’s a world record holder and, best of all, he’s one of ours. Read on below…


Let’s get a few background things nailed down first – were are you from originally?

I was born in Coventry and lived there until I was 11. I didn’t skate at that point though – we moved to Stroud in Gloucestershire around that time, which is where I started skateboarding.

 

When did Bristol come into the picture?

Well, Bristol was the closest big city to Stroud and it had a really strong skate scene, skateparks, loads of spots, etc. We’d travel there regularly to skate from early on really – it seemed like the obvious place to go to. Then I ended up moving there at 17.

 

 

What was your first published magazine photo?

My first photo was from an SS20 jam in Botley (where the bowl used to be) in 1991 – the caption read ‘cold kicking in effect’. That was the same event that Tom (Penny) got his first photo in R.A.D as well, which is quite mad thinking back on it. His photo was of a mute and mine was a one-foot tailgrab. I was already skating with Tom a lot at that point, travelling around to events, going over to skate the ramps in Oxford and Leamington Spa, he’d come over to Gloucester…

 

SS20 (OG Oxford skate store) was your first sponsor too, right?

Yeah, that happened after the Botley jam where I first got a photo in R.A.D. that I mentioned – it might have been related to that as I probably met Mon Barbour (SS20 owner) for the first time at the Botley jam. Sometime after that I started getting boards from Jeremy (Fox) as I was going to ride for Deathbox kind of. Then when it changed from DB to Flip I started getting flowed Flip boards too. It wouldn’t want to say that I was ‘riding for them’ because I wasn’t officially but it was kind of floating around as a possibility at the time.

 

 

When did Powell skateboards come into the picture?

Around the same time that the Deathbox/Flip thing seemed like it was kind of on the cards Shiner hit me up about riding for Powell. So I was riding for Powell through a distributor at first. That lasted for a couple of years until Powell wanted to fly me out to Santa Barbara to check me out. My first time on a plane, first time out of England – straight to Santa Barbara. I was completely out of my depth. I was expecting to get shot in a fucking drive-by at first (laughing).

 

What about Vans – when did that start?

Hard to say precisely because I’d ridden for them through a distro a long, long time in the past, long before I officially rode for them. I had stints on Emerica and Etnies before quitting those and ending up on the Vans Europe team. The thing there though was that I never did much in Europe at that point as this was in the late-90s when I was spending a lot of time in the USA doing things with Powell.
I spent more time in the States than I did in England back then, I’m struggling to remember actual dates though – I’m definitely not the best fact checker as I was probably swimming around in bong water for a lot of that period, (laughs).
Officially, I became a member of the global, ‘proper’ Vans team in 2000, hence the 20-year anniversary this year. I’d got shoes from them before that in various formats but it was never an official deal until 2000.

 

You’ve had two pro shoes from Vans during that time too, correct?

Yeah that’s right – one in 2001 and the other in 2003.

 

 

You’ve got to be the only UK pro skater to have done that whilst still being based in the UK…

Well, I wasn’t really ‘based in the UK’ for the entirety of that time, like I said already I did spend a lot of time in the USA. I guess you could say that I’m the only pro skater from this country to have ended up with pro model shoes on Vans who didn’t move permanently to America. That’s probably more of an accurate way of putting it. I did it my own way for sure.

 

The 2000 highest ollie thing – I know this has been talked to death already but we ought to mention it: I don’t know anyone else who’s in the Guinness Book of Records…

(Laughs), it is what it is. I’m proud of myself for doing that, I’m proud of all my achievements because, come on, I’m from a council estate in Coventry, I wasn’t exactly set up to achieve very much. Skateboarding came through hard for me. I’m not going to lie, it does still amuse me that I managed to win ‘The Reese Forbes Ollie Challenge’ despite not taking it ultra-seriously like a lot of the other people involved who were training, long before the idea of training for a contest was a thing like it is now. That is pretty funny to look back on, lots of the other people involved were filming clips for 411 showing how they were preparing for it like it was some battle or something whereas myself, I just adopted the same approach that I always did to skateboarding: get super high and just…skate. It worked out. Aside from that stuff though which has been talked about a lot in the past, I felt at the time, and I still do now, that me winning that thing kind of stood for British and European skateboarding at the time. That’s how I felt about it. It was a bit of a ‘fuck you’ from our scene I felt like. You know your man’s acting all Billy Big Balls, filming his victory lap before the contest had even started.
I remember thinking at the time, ‘chill out – we haven’t even started yet’, (laughs). It was presented as such a big deal at the time, like this showcase of pro skating with a huge emphasis on America and I turned up stoned out of my mind, totally anti-social as ever, not talking to any cunt because I couldn’t be bothered and still took it home with me. Like I say, I’m proud that I achieved that on a personal level but for me I was more proud of the way that it shone a light on UK skating and kind of said “we’re here”, you know what I mean?

 

Absolutely, in the same way that Tom Penny winning Radlands in 1995 in front of the entire world of pro skateboarding did…

Yeah I guess: that was the most unbelievable two-fingers up of all time.
He won that contest with his hands in his pockets. I’ve seen Tom skate better on a Sunday afternoon in a car park. That contest run, that has subsequently gone down in history, was about 2% of what he could do. He was fucking yawning throughout his run, (laughs). You remember that? That’s how easily it came to him, unbelievable. My man was yawning, his hand over his mouth mid-run in front of every single person in the industry at that time. Only a couple of years before a lot of the same people had been laughing about his clothes or his style or whatever – he showed them didn’t he? Who’s laughing now? They all started worshipping him from that point onwards. Tom’s the best.

 

Can we talk about that period shortly afterwards where you basically came first in every contest in Europe consecutively?

(Laughing), that was the year that my daughter was born. I just decided ‘right, I’m going to enter every contest and win them all, the money’s mine’.
I was on a mission. It worked though, there was one summer (2004 I think) where I won every single one that I entered. Not to be a knob about it obviously but I genuinely only went there with the intention of winning. As mercenary as that might sound, that’s why I was there. I was about to become a dad so I wasn’t playing around. I won the European Championships first and then just followed the contest circuit through Europe taking all the cash, (laughs).

 

You were always good at mixing it up in that way though – you’ve filmed more street parts than I can think of but you’re not afraid to switch the contest mode on when it’s necessary.

Yeah, you’re right. That’s how I looked at it too. I never wanted to get labeled as a ‘contest guy’ and filming and shooting street footage was always my priority but (back then more so than now maybe) part of your job as a pro skater was to step up to the contest scene as well. I wasn’t afraid to get my hands dirty when there was so much money up for grabs and all you had to do was skate perfect skateparks for a couple of minutes on your own in a stadium. No brainer really.

 

What about your first skate magazine cover?

That was a R.A.D cover in 1995, shot by Wig Worland at Bedminster skatepark in Bristol: a backside ollie on the original banks.

 

When did you and Syd open up 5050?

We opened up in 1997. It felt like something that needed to happen because of how big the scene was and how many skaters there were here. Bristol needed an SOS to cater to that, to help people out, give them routes into sponsorship, organize events, make videos, all of that. You only get that kind of infrastructure with a skater-owned store, because those are the people invested in the scene because they’re a part of it as well. A long time ago man…

 

That was back in the era when you looked like a skeleton, right?

(Laughs), yeah well I lived off cans of Coke and weed at that point in my life, with the odd Mr. Kipling’s thrown in for nutritional value. Not a diet I’d recommend to anyone else looking back but it worked at the time. I’ve gone fully the other way now – all I do these days is eat and drink red wine. Comes to us all in the end…

 

You’ve been into painting since you were really young too, right?

Yeah, I’ve always been involved in making art, painting, graffiti – I’ve been tagging since I was 8 years old – longer than I’ve been into skating. Like every skater really, we all tend to have multiple interests that cross over. There are lots of creative types in this culture – if I hadn’t already been into it, no doubt I’d have been introduced to painting and art more generally through skateboarding. It’s as big a part of my everyday life as skateboarding is.

 

Am I right in thinking that you were one of the first pro skaters to go to China as well?

Steve Caballero and I were the first pro skaters to travel to China. Strangely that didn’t end up being mentioned in Grosso’s (RIP) Loveletter to China but yeah, we were the first to go there. We went to Beijing in 1994 for two weeks. This was back when China was a hugely different country to the way it is today. Back then, everyone out on the streets would be wearing those blue workers suits, all dressed exactly the same – everybody would ride the same bicycles. I guess this was when China was still pretty much closed off to the rest of the world – an amazing experience for sure. I remember arriving in Beijing in a pair of all-white Half Cabs and feeling like I was at Embarcadero or something, (laughs). Well crispy.

 

Why did you pick the Chukka for this 20-year celebratory release?

It was always a shoe that I really liked. I’d wear them a long time ago, back when I was still paying for shoes. I’d modify them – put fat laces in them, extra tongues to make them look puffier. The style of that era, the really early 90s ‘Simon Evans thing’ – you see that being replicated again now so I thought it was a good time to revive what had always been a favourite shoe of mine. I’d always thought that Vans ought to do more with the Chukka because it’s such a classic, beautiful-looking silhouette. It was so popular in the early 90s – when people used to put bam in them to get the fat, padded tongue look. It looked so dope modified like that and it always surprised me that Vans didn’t jump on that, following skater-modifications the way they did with the Half Cab for example, which came about after people started cutting the original Full Cab down themselves. So anyway, I added padding to the Chukka Pro that we’re talking about now to try and get that look to it. Updating it but with a definite nod to the past. I added 5 mm of padding to the tongue at first, then when I saw the first sample, I doubled that to 10mm – to be honest, if it was entirely up to me I’d have probably added 30mm, (laughs), trying to relive the past – back when I wasn’t grey and my back worked properly. I’m stoked on how they’ve come out though, like I said, I always wanted the Chukka to get more love so it’s nice to have a chance to do this. The way I remember the era when it was first a popular Vans shoe, back in the early 90s, it seemed as though all of us who were starting to get into the mags at the time, myself, Geoff (Rowley), Tom – we were all wearing the Chukka so it has a strong place in my heart.

 

What’s your official job title at Vans these days?

I’m not sure that I have an official title as such – maybe ‘grassroots marketing/activation’? I work for Vans heading up their entire core skateboarding/grass roots events program and whatnot. It’s a bit of everything really – working alongside shops, organizing and doing logistics for events, helping local scenes to do things – the long and the short of it is that I’m on the ground floor if you like. I’m the point of contact in Europe for all the grass roots stuff that Vans are involved in. It’s sick. I get to work with the people who make everything happen. I get to feed my experience and my love of skating, art, music, food into everything I’m involved with – I’m lucky to have the opportunity to do that.
Vans are a family man – people often flippantly say that kind of thing but with Vans it is actually borne out by their actions and the support they offer to skateboarding. Throughout this Covid situation they haven’t got rid of one skater or one TM you know? They ran that ‘Foot the Bill’ program with skater-owned stores across the world which, if they marketed it correctly, those shops would make a solid amount of money completely funded by Vans right at the height of the Corona virus lockdown when everyone was really anxious about surviving. You know, it’s one thing to talk about supporting skateboarding and the grass roots, but it’s another thing to actually put your money where your mouth is. Vans always have done that – it’s 100% legit. I didn’t see too many other huge brands doing anything similar you know? I’m honoured to be part of the Vans family and to work for them. That’s why I’ve been with them for 20 years.

Check out our full range of Vans products here.


Jeff Grosso’s final Loveletter to LGBTQ+ skateboarding

Wednesday, June 17th, 2020

Jeff Grosso’s final Loveletter to LGBTQ+ skateboarding just went live and stands in testament to the depth of loveliness that our much-missed sage represents. We can only hope that the big pink one is surveying the scene from above and is smiling that unmistakable grin as the Internet reacts to his Loveletter to LGBTQ+ skateboarders the world over. Absolute magic this one.

I’m not going to waste your time by recounting who’s in it, what gets discussed or why it’s an extremely timely embrace of our brother and sisters in arms because, unless you’re stupid, you’ll already appreciate the significance of this being Grosso’s final Loveletter.
We’ve come a long way since the days of women featuring in skate brand adverts purely as eye-candy wearing skate clothing not designed for them, and even more so in the slow but exponentially increasing open acceptance of the huge LGBTQ+ community but there’s still a way to go and this Grosso/Vans release is going to do a lot to expedite that change.

Like I already said, I’m not going to patronise you, you know that this is the perfect send off to one of skateboarding’s most beloved voices. If you ever needed proof of the fact that Jeff Grosso loved the act of skateboarding with all his heart and soul, then this 36 minute video provides it.
We love you Jeff Grosso.

If this has put you in the mood for more of the great man, (and why wouldn’t it?) – head over to our very own Loveletter to Jeff Grosso here.

With the above said, we can also strongly recommend checking out the full-length ‘Euro There’ video from LGBTQ+ skate crew/brand There Skateboards (featuring a bunch of the people interviewed in Grosso’s final Loveletter to skateboarding). We’ve even made it easy for you by embedding it below.
It’s 2020 and there are millions of skateboarders in the world. Let’s try to make our shared universe that little bit more pleasant by trying to be nice to each other, it’s really not that difficult.

Jeff Grosso's final Loveletter to LGBTQ+ skateboarding


Latest Stussy drop | Stussy video recap from over the years

Thursday, June 4th, 2020

How Original from Stüssy on Vimeo.

 

 

With the arrival of 2020’s latest Stussy drop in store and online, we thought we’d take this opportunity to shed a little bit of light on this most OG of skate/surf streetwear brands. Founded in Laguna Beach back the early 80’s by surfer and skateboarder Shawn Stussy, the brand that created the format for what we now know as ‘streetwear’ began life as a marker pen scribble adorning Stussy’s hand shaped surfboards.

 

 

Not long after, that very same scribble evolved into the now universally recognised logo (based on his Uncle Jan’s actual signature) and the brand took its first steps into the world of soft goods. Stussy began selling shorts, caps and T-shirts bearing the same logo out of the back of his car and thus one of the first ever streetwear labels, (long before the term ‘streetwear’ really existed) was born.
From these humble beginnings Stussy went on to partner with Frank Sinatra Jr (no, not that one) and expanded, opening a boutique home brand store in SoHo, New York, setting up international distribution and being one of the first brands of its kind to see their clothing sitting alongside high end designer fashion labels. As such, Stussy laid the foundations of the model later adopted by British-born Supreme founder James Jebbia, who had worked with Shawn Stussy prior to opening up the first Supreme store (also in SoHo) back in 1994. The brand basically created the template of how to fuse the worlds of catwalk fashion with functionality to create clothes that look equally dope down the local fancy beer boozer or whilst you’re sliding through tramp’s piss trying to conquer the snide 3 at Aldi.
Latest Stussy drop Stussy video recap

 

 

With that little potted history out of the way, allow me to take you on a short guided tour of some primo content produced over the years by Stussy. Their team has changed a great deal since the beginning of the brand but I genuinely think you’d be hard pressed to find anybody who made Stussy garms look cooler than the UK’s very own Curtis McCann who ran their gear super hard in the late 80’s. With that fundamental statement of truth out of the way, feast your eyes on some recent, and not so recent, Stussy video output above (in the shape of the most recent clip ‘How Original’ featuring the current team), and below, via a smattering of 90’s era Stussy skate video gold. Enjoy.

 

If you fancy dipping your furloughed fingers into the latest wavey garments delivered by this titan of the streetwear universe then head over to the webstore to see the full latest Stussy drop online now.

 

2017’s ‘Tribe’ video featuring Kevin Terpening, Caleb Barnett, Aaron Loreth, Jesse Alba, Max Klein, and Lance Mountain.

TRIBE from Stüssy on Vimeo.

 

 

Mid 90’s nostalgia here with a Stussy London clip from 411VM Issue 43 (2000) featuring Keith Hufnagel, Richard Mulder,Scott Johnston, Chad Tim Tim,Danny Montoya and Justin Reynolds hitting various London hotspots.

 

 

And last but not least – more 411VM nostalgia with the same Stussy crew as above hitting Japan for 411 62 (2004). God I miss 411VM.