News Tagged ‘Welcome To Hell’

Welcome to Hell – huge Toy Machine skateboards drop in stock

Thursday, February 4th, 2021

As we edge into February we’ve been blessed with a huge Toy Machine skateboards drop which gives us an excuse to delve in loyal pawn history.
Toy Machine skateboards was founded from the ashes of the earlier abortive Ed Templeton and Mike Vallely 90s skate brand TV (as in ‘Television’) in 1993, and was Ed’s first solo-effort following his huge success as the headline pro of New Deal Skateboards.

Looking back on the trajectory of Toy Machine since (which incidentally has to be one of the best brand names in skate history), it’s hard to to think of it as the tiny brand populated by a bunch of largely unknown skaters that it began life as on their inaugural video release ‘Live!’ (see above)
Featuring such household names as Charlie Coatney and Pete Lehman, (although admittedly backed up by Ed T, a young Ethan Fowler and Jahmal Williams), Live! made Ed’s decision to ditch the mighty New Deal at the height of his fame seems somewhat foolhardy to say the least.
However, in much the same way that the creepy vegan predated the highwater Dickies trend by two decades, his decision to start up Toy Machine skateboards under the Tum Yeto distribution umbrella as a solo effort also found vindication (and more) as time progressed and the team picked up various heads who would go on to to have a huge impact on skate culture.

Toy Machine skateboards drop

Toy Machine skateboard‘s second video ‘Heavy Metal’ (1995) introduced an entirely new team (with the exception of Ed T) with the likes of Josh Kalis, Satva Leung, Panama Dan and Jamie Thomas hopping on.
Heavy Metal also introduced the world to the filming and editing skills of Jamie Thomas and set the scene for the truly epoch-forming third Toy Machine video, which we’ll come to in a minute.

The third full-length release from Toy Machine a year later in 1996 saw Ed T’s fledgling enterprise finally come of age and drop what has gone on to be one of the most influential skate videos of all-time. Not only did Welcome to Hell set in motion the second wave of Pat Duffy inspired handrail mania, it also resurrected the tradition of slam sections, alongside blowing global minds with the first ever proper female street skater part in the form of the utterly timeless Elisa Steamer section.
It probably sounds like an exaggeration read in 2021 but honestly, Welcome to Hell changed everything.

If you’ve never seen it before – prepare yourselves.

Obviously, from 1996 onwards Toy Machine evolved further, lost team riders, acquired new ones and has gone on to create a lot of noise to this day, even within the extremely crowded skate brand universe of 2021.
If you want to know more about the ups and downs of Toy Machine life span then you’d be well advised to give Ed Templeton’s Epicly Later’d series a watch – peep below for the first one.

Anyhow – that’s it for now – stay up hombres!


Welcome To Hell – The Raw Tour Tapes

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016

 

20 years ago back in 1996, Toy Machine (then just three years old) released its third video titled Welcome To Hell. It was a dramatic change compared to Live! from 1994, when the team was made up of Ed Templeton, Jerry Fowler, Ethan Fowler, Joe Nemeth and others like Joel Danenhauer who could be found skating the Huntington Beach skate park. That progressed into Heavy Metal, Toy Machine’s second video offering from 1995 which saw Jamie Thomas take most of the control in the video and directing side of things. At that time, skateboarding popularity was on the up-rise. The X-Games had premiered on television (1995) and having a career within skateboarding was looking more viable. The early-90’s Goofy Boy stage of tiny wheels, giant clothes and oh so tech ledge combinations was faded away and by 1996 the emphasis came back to style and speed. That summer the team went on a U.S tour and now 20 years later raw footage has emerged from Josh Stewart’s archives. Ed, Jamie, Donny Barley, Brian Anderson, and the team skated demos on car parks with random obstacles in front of mellow crowds. There are baggy jeans and, of course, cargo pants, and there are early Zero T-shirt sightings. In the years that followed riders came and went but Ed stuck with Toy Machine. Welcome To Hell helped inspire an entire generation of skateboarders. Click play on the clips below for a glimpse of mid-90’s nostalgia.

 

 

 

 

See our full range of Toy Machine here > https://www.blacksheepstore.co.uk/toy-machine.html

 

 


Welcome To Hell

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

 

toy machine logo

 

Toy Machine, a company that has been nothing but solid from the start (1993). It was created by Ed Templeton, one of skateboarding’s veterans who with out a doubt has one the best FS nose-blunts in the game! Initially, at the birth of the brand Templeton couldn’t decide what name to give this new comapany. It was a choice between “Toy Skateboards” or “Machine Skateboards”. It was when his good friend and fellow professional skateboarder Ethan Fowler suggested a combination of the two propositions, giving you Toy Machine Skateboards.

 

ed templeton

 

Templeton was born in Orange County, California, US and began skateboarding in 1985. You would have found him cruising the streets of his home town, that was Huntington Beach with his good pal Jason Lee who you may recognize from the popular comedy series ‘My Name Is Earl’, otherwise it’ll be for his mad quirky style on a board. With Templeton he saw nothing but a career in skateboarding, fully committed from an early age, ‘The first thing that I ever saw was a kid skating down the street and he ollied up a curb; that was, you know, the thing that got me started. I thought that was the coolest thing ever, like, how could this guy just keep cruising down the street and not have to stop and pick up his board.’ I’ll have to agree with that too, I thought it was magic. He most definitely didn’t see himself going back to life as a normal human being anyway. He obviously made the right choice as he went on to produce some powerful video parts that have included the best style/selection of tricks I’ve ever seen. His part in ‘Welcome To Hell’ was bonkers!

 

 

 

Holy shit, the One Foot FS lip at 1:30, mind blowing. Templeton has produced many more parts too that I highly recommend you watch, Toy Machine: Jump Off A Building, Emerica: This Is Skateboarding, Toy Machine: Suffer The Joy, Emerica: Stay Gold, the list goes on. As-well as having an incredible career in skateboarding Templeton is also a well respected artist which connects hugely with Toy Machine as the really familiar graphics used in conjunction with the brand have mostly been designed by himself. The well known character featured below can easily be renown as the face of Toy Machine.

 

 

toy machine graphic

 

 

Other graphics that come to mind are the Toy Machine Knuckles, The Eye and the Devil, all of them are brilliant designs. Not only are the graphics on fire but their team is also one to be proud of. You will find Diego “The Butcher” Bucchieri, Billy Marks, Josh Harmony, Leo Romero, Matt Bennett, Collin Provost, Jordan Taylor, Daniel Lutheran, Blake Carpenter and Jeremy Leabres shredding the boards. Some of the skateboarders who joined the company during its early period were Brian Anderson, Elissa Steamer, and Brad Staba. However, all three quit the company at the same time. Austin Stephens also joined the team, he actually became the longest-serving team member aside from Templeton but sadly retired from professional skateboarding in December 2013. To commemorate  Stephens’s career they released a tribute skateboard deck and Templeton officially stated:

 

I recall Austin coming to me at the Toy Machine Halloween demo a few years back saying that he didn’t think he could do it anymore. And I said, “Do what?” and he said, “Skateboard. My ankle doesn’t work anymore.” … I respect a man who is willing to see things as they are and make an honest choice. So it was with great sadness that we retired Austin Stephens, the rider who was on Toy Machine the longest aside from me.

 

It’s a really shame loosing skaters that many of us have looked up too from an early age due to injury. Although let’s not dwell as I’m sure the current team will go on to produce many more eye catching videos for us all to get hyped on. Here’s Nick Trapasso’s part from one of Toy Machine’s more recent videos, ‘Brainwash’. More style than Vivienne Westwood right there.

 

 

 

 

I love working in a skate shop, none other than here but it’s amazing when you can reminisce about a brand you’ve grown up with. A new drop of Toy Machine boards have just arrived and it takes me right back to being a kid staring at the yet familiar graphics that were plastered on a wall in my local skate shop. I’m pleased to say, you can still find them now on display including here at The Black Sheep Store. All I ask is that you take time to consider this skater owned brand next time you’re thinking of replacing your old whip with a new plank. It deserves a lots of respect and I’m extremely glad my bosses are willing to support one of skateboarding’s finest by constantly stocking Toy Machine. If you’re from Manchester or just appreciate good music you’d be mad to miss out on the new Joy Division inspired graphic.

 

Toy_Machine_-_Toy_Division_-_8.0

 

Keep up with Toy Machine on Instagram.

 

Purchase your Toy Machine product right here…  https://www.blacksheepstore.co.uk/toy-machine.html